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PRODUCTION

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FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

2018

On Top of the World

(Greenland)

29 mins 10 secs

 

 

 

 

 

©2018

ABC Ultimo Centre

700 Harris Street Ultimo

NSW 2007 Australia

 

GPO Box 9994

Sydney

NSW 2001 Australia

Phone: 61 2 8333 4383

Fax:   61 2 8333 4859

 

e-mail thompson.haydn@abc.net.au


Precis

Is the world going mad when Greenlanders fight drought and brushfires and catch warm water fish? A decade after discovering a farming boom in Greenland, the ABC’s Eric Campbell returns to see how locals are facing up to climate change.

 

 

When Greenland scientist Teunis Jansen cuts open the stinking guts of a Bluefin tuna, he unlocks a secret to the world’s climate.

 

 

“Climate change takes many surprising ways,” he observes, as he delves into the big fish’s belly.

 

 

The tuna is full of whole mackerel, a warm water fish that is suddenly abundant in Greenland’s waters, in turn attracting more tuna as well. So abundant that it now accounts for up to a quarter of the island’s exports.

 

 

For Greenlanders, this is a happy quirk of the warming that is gripping their formidable land. While the rest of the world fights to stop a two-degree temperature rise, it’s already a fact in much of Greenland.

 

 

Ten years ago Eric Campbell met farmers there excited by the prospect of longer growing seasons. Now he returns to find some doing well - but battling a scourge familiar to Australian farmers.

 

 

“They’ve had a lot of droughts… It’s become more or less the new normal,” agronomist Kenneth Hoegh tells Campbell.

 

 

 

 

 

Inuit photographer Adam Lyberth grieves for his land as he records its ancient glaciers crumbling, its vast ice cap melting like never before. Sandy desert sits alongside melting ice. Tundra fires, says Lyberth, are spooking reindeer and making them harder to hunt.

 

 

“It hurts the heart,” he tells Campbell as they drive out to the ice sheet that holds eight per cent of the world’s fresh water.

 

 

Greenland’s melting season starts earlier and finishes later than it used to.  So the speed of the melt has doubled, adding to sea levels.

 

 

“If you were to melt the whole Greenland ice sheet here, we’re talking about seven metres’ sea level rise,” says local climate scientist Thomas Juul-Pedersen.

 

 

Some Greenlanders would rather see an upside to climate change. In Greenland’s only inland town Kangerlussuaq, Campbell meets 13-year-old Athena. She laments the cold and boring Arctic winters.

 

 

“it would be nicer to be warmer. Yeah, I could use some of that,” she says.

 

Drone shots over ice. GFX:
FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT

Music

00:00

GVs Greenland scenery

 

00:03

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: It’s the world’s biggest island and potentially its biggest problem.

00:10

 

THOMAS JUUL-PEDERSEN: “If you were to melt the whole Greenland ice sheet here, we’re talking

00:15

Thomas 100%

about around seven metres sea level rise”.

00:17

GVs Greenland town

ERIC CAMPBELL: Global warming isn’t a theory here, it’s life.

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “This is ground zero

00:21

Kenneth and Campbell on boat at glacier

for climate change, yeah”.

00:26

Glacier

Music

00:27

Faces

ERIC CAMPBELL: We’re on a journey through an ancient land giving a glimpse of our future.  Some fear the change, and some can’t wait.

000:33

Athena

ATHENA: “It would be nicer to be warmer.  Yeah, I could use some of that”.

00:43

Aerials over glacier

Music

00:50

Campbell on boat at glacier. GFX:
REPORTER: ERIC CAMPBELL

ERIC CAMPBELL: “Now it might seem strange in a place like this to be talking about global warming and climate change when there’s still so much ice and so much snow and it’s still so cold, but here’s the thing, a rise in temperature of just one degree can literally mean the difference between ice and water”.

00:54

 

Music

01:14

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: And in Greenland, the melting ice and warming water are creating winners as well as losers. 

01:21

Crops on  farm

Ten years ago, we saw how farmers were cashing in on warmer seasons.

01:28

Teunis weighs fish in lab

Today, there’s a surprising new boom on the top of the world.

 

TEUNIS JANSEN: “Four hundred and seventy grams.  Climate change takes many surprising ways I guess”.

01:35

Glacier

Music

01:46

GFX: ON TOP OF THE WORLD

 

01:55

Adam playing drum

 

02:07

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: Adam Lyberth loves his island home,

02:12

Glacier

from the glaciers and ice sheet that cover most of Greenland,

02:16

Northern Lights

to the Northern Lights that appear each autumn as if by magic. 

02:22

Adam on glacier/Wildlife

He reveres his Inuit heritage and the wonder of Arctic wildlife – from reindeer to musk ox. 

02:28

Adam with drum

But lately his Inuit heart has been breaking like the glaciers.

02:35

Glaciers

Music

02:42

 

ADAM LYBERTH: [subtitle] “When you are surrounded by such amazing nature

02:45

Adam 100%

you especially notice how the ice and ice sheet are changing and it’s becoming darker and melting rapidly”.

02:52

Glacial scenery

Music

03:06

Kangerlussuaq GVs

ERIC CAMPBELL: Adam lives in Kangerlussuaq, a town of 500 people just inside the Arctic circle.  In World War II the Americans built an airbase here.  It slowly turned this hunting ground into

03:17

Airport

Greenland’s international hub.  Most visitors just pass through here on the way to the main tourist destinations, but for

03:34

Adam driving

Adam  it’s the best place to see what’s coming for the planet.

03:44

 

Music

03:48

 

ADAM LYBERTH: [subtitle] “I have easy access to three big glaciers.  It’s very easy to see the change, the climatic change, even the landscape, the vegetation”.

03:53

Glacial scenery

Music

04:04

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: This is the only place you can drive to the massive ice cap that covers more than three quarters of Greenland.  Adam has spent decades taking people out to see it.

[driving in car] “So you’ve had a fairly

04:09

Campbell in car with Adam

unique view of all this, haven’t you?”

04:25

 

ADAM LYBERTH: [subtitle] “More than 300 days a year, going up there”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “So you’ve been there thousands of time over thirty-five years”.

 

ADAM LYBERTH: “Yeah”.

04:28

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “That’s quite a good look at how it’s changed then”.

 

ADAM LYBERTH: “Yeah”.

04:37

Aerials of landscape

ERIC CAMPBELL: Since his childhood in the 1950s, the average temperature has risen 1.5 degrees.  That’s turning the land bone dry. It’s a sandy desert alongside melting ice.

04:44

 

ADAM LYBERTH: [subtitle] “We can see the change, the climatic change.  Like last year we have no rain in the summer. 

05:02

Adam driving

If you look here to the right side, you can see the lake sinking”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “Yeah and you’ve had some bushfires too”.

05:07

 

ADAM LYBERTH: [subtitle] “Yeah.  This is very unusual.  Some hunters say it’s difficult to find reindeer in this area because of the heavy smell of bushfire.

05:13

 

It’s a very strong smell. I know the reindeer and the wildlife doesn’t like it”.

05:25

Russell Glacier,

Music

05:29

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: Twenty-five kilometres from town is our first stop, Russell Glacier, one of nearly 100 big glaciers that flow down from the ice sheet.

05:33

Adam with Campbell at glacier

ADAM LYBERTH: [subtitle] “Seven years ago, where we’re standing here we could not see the mountain behind us.  The glacier was closer and maybe taller.  Between 2012 and 15, the glacier behind us lost 30 per cent.  So we can see how fast the change is here”.

05:45

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “Does it make you sad when you see the changes like this?”

 

ADAM LYBERTH: “Yes, even for me”.

06:04

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: Adam hasn’t just witnessed the changes with his eyes, for 35 years he’s been documenting them through his lens.  Building up a rare and comprehensive record.

06:08

Ice falling from glacier face

Music

06:25

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: In a time of balance, this calving, when huge chunks fall from the glacier face,

06:52

Aerials. Glacier

should be offset by ice moving down from the sheet behind it, but for decades now he’s seen a system out of kilter.  The ice is disappearing and the land is changing.

06:56

Glacial scenery

Music

07:10

Adam driving with Campbell

 

07:19

 

ADAM LYBERTH: [subtitle] “Now it’s autumn, the bush growing earlier, and now it’s very growing bigger.  When we change a little bit of the temperature, we have a big effect here in the Arctic”.

07:27

Driving to ice cap

Music

07:40

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: The main change is on the ice sheet, better known as the ice cap.  It’s so vast that nobody lives in Greenland interior.  In 1999 the road to Russell Glacier was extended to the ice cap’s edge.  At 38 kilometres, this is Greenland’s longest road.

07:45

 

ADAM LYBERTH: “This is end of the road”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “The end of the road. 

 

 

 

08:11

Campbell and Adam out of car

It’s a bit chillier up here”.

 

ADAM LYBERTH: “Yeah”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: The walk from the car park to the ice cap is getting ever longer.

08:15

Walking to ice cap

Music

08:22

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “This area’s gone down in the last few years?”

 

ADAM LYBERTH: [subtitle] “Yeah, you can see that the big ice is going deeper and deeper. After I think 12 years the area sunk nearly 180 metres lower”.

08:28

Ice cap

ERIC CAMPBELL: The ice cap is a holdover from the last ice age.  Elsewhere in Europe and North America, giant glaciers like this melted 10,000 years ago.  Here Arctic temperatures preserved it.  What melted in summer was replenished by winter snow.

08:48

Walking on ice cap

ADAM LYBERTH: [subtitle] “This is ice under”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “So we’re on the ice sheet now”.

 

ADAM LYBERTH: “Yeah”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “Okay, freshly covered with snow”.

 

ADAM LYBERTH: [subtitle] “The first snow this year”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “Since summer?  Okay”.

09:07

 

ADAM LYBERTH: “Yeah”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “So the melting season is over?  For now”.

 

ADAM LYBERTH: “Yeah, for now”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: The problem now is that the ice cap is shrinking.

09:18

Glacial melt

 Every year is different, but most years it’s losing more ice in the warm months than it gains in the colder months.  The reason that’s a big problem is that the cap is so incredibly big. 

09:28

Campbell and Adam on ice cap

We’re standing on 8 per cent of the entire world’s freshwater.

 

ADAM LYBERTH: [subtitle] “From here is the longest part, from north to south is 2,700 kilometres long ice sheet and the widest part is 1,500 kilometres wide, 3.5 kilometres thick ice”.

09:44

Sunrise/Plane trip

Music

10:04

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: The only way to try to grasp its size is to see it from the air. 

10:13

 

Music

10:17

Campbell in plane

ERIC CAMPBELL:  As soon as you rise over Kangerlussuaq, you see giant crevasses and massive rivers of meltwater.  The cap is so vast it will never melt entirely, but it’s big enough that even small changes on the surface can push up sea levels around the world.  And since 2004, the melt has been accelerating fast.  The US space agency NASA estimates it’s been losing 30 billion tonnes more every year.

10:37

Thomas

Thomas Juul-Pedersen is a senior scientist at the Greenland Climate Research Centre.

 

THOMAS JUUL-PEDERSEN: “The ice sheet has always been melting,

11:17

Thomas 100%

there’s always been a melting season, but that melting season seems to dramatically increase.  So it starts melting earlier, and the melt continues for full into the autumn every year. 

11:24

Glacial melt

And last year there was a very high melt season for instance and it started very early.  It is telling us that climate change is real.  There’s no doubt about that”.

11:38

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: Climate change sceptics do cast doubt, pointing out that the cap grew slightly this season thanks to record snowfall. 

11:48

File footage. Hurricanes

But that was caused by record hurricanes.  A series of superstorms in the Caribbean sent record precipitation all the way to the Arctic.

12:00

 

THOMAS JUUL-PEDERSEN: “It’s the same trend you see not only in Greenland, but in many places around the world where

12:12

Thomas

more numerous hurricanes, larger hurricanes, droughts, floodings – all these things – it’s all signs of a changing climate. 

12:17

Ice sheet

The ice sheet is comprised of old snow, so when new snow or more snow on it will of course increase the mass of the ice sheet, but if that is followed by increased melting as well in the following years, then it will go away as well”.

12:27

Kangerlussuaq high school students

[singing]

12:43

 

Teacher in class

ERIC CAMPBELL: At Kangerlussuaq’s only high school, the kids learn they’re growing up in a very different world.  That doesn’t mean they’re worried.

12:58

 

TEACHER: [subtitle] “Kangerlussuaq is 200 metres above sea level so we won’t get flooded”.

13:11

Athena

ATHENA: “My name is Athena and I am 13 years old.  I like it very much here.  There’s a lot of nature and stuff. 

13:20

 

In the summer I go rowing and kayaking or whatever and me and my friends we go out camping and stuff.  My dad, he’s a hunter, so he got all these hunters going hunting and stuff”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “What about in winter, what’s winter like?”

 

ATHENA: “Winter is pretty boring”.

13:31

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “So are you worried about rising temperatures or do you think it might be nice to be warmer?”

13:57

 

ATHENA: “It would be nicer to be warmer.  Yeah.  I could use some of that”.

14:02

Kangerlussuaq kids

ERIC CAMPBELL: And that’s the irony here.  The place most affected by climate change is perhaps the least concerned by it.

14:10

 

SCHOOL KIDS: [subtitle] “Kangerlussuaq!”

14:21

Campbell on to ferry

ERIC CAMPBELL: Most people welcome the extra warmth, nowhere more so than in Greenland’s farming heartland.

14:25

 

Music

14:32

 

ERIC CAMPBELL:  This is the start of a giant fjord through Kujalleq in the far south where Vikings settled a thousand years ago.  Today, thousands still live in isolated hamlets connected only by boat.

14:38

Campbell to camera

[on boat] “The last time I was in this part of Greenland 10 years ago, farmers were getting pretty excited about global warming because rising temperatures meant they could grow a lot more crops and animals.  So, we’re coming back to see how they’ve faired and if this is still a part of the planet where people are benefiting from climate change”.

14:53

Ferry to farming hamlet

Music

15:14

 

ERIC CAMPBELL:  It’s early autumn now and doesn’t feel that warm. 

15:49

Campbell walking down wharf

You can have four seasons a day, most of them cold.

 

 

 

 

15:54

Campbell greets Kenneth

“Kenneth, hey mate, how are you?”

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “Well I’m good”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “You haven’t changed in ten years”.

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “You as well”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “Oh you’re a liar”. 

15:57

Kenneth and Campbell in snow

Our guide through the fjord will be Kenneth Hoegh, a former agricultural consultant who’s just been named Deputy Foreign Minister.

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “This is Greenland sun.  The sun is up there… somewhere”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “So let’s have a look around”.

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “Yeah, please, please come around.  Take care, it’s slippery”.

16:04

 

Music

16:21

Excerpt from earlier story. GFX:
FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT 2007

ERIC CAMPBELL: A decade ago, in blazing summer sunshine, Kenneth took us down this same fjord to see a farming revolution.  Rising temperatures since the mid-‘90s had extended the growing season by three weeks.

16:27

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “Now they are willing to grow turnips and potatoes commercially, and it used to be only for the farm and now they are willing to invest a lot of money to grow them commercially on a larger scale”.

16:44

Farmer Egede carries turnips

ERIC CAMPBELL: Farmers like Ferdinand Egede were rapidly expanding their flocks and planting more fields.  The only downside was that summer had been unusually dry.

16:59

Hoegh and Egede

KENNETH HOEGH: [subtitle] “On the way out here I was thinking that you should have a permanent irrigation system.

17:10

Glacier

ERIC CAMPBELL: But farmer Egede was sceptical that the warming was here to stay.

 

FARMER EGEDE: [subtitle] “I really don’t believe that pollution is to blame for Greenland getting warmer. 

 

 

17:18

Egede

The eighties were very cold, while the nineties were a bit better – and now it’s also good.  That’s the way it is”.

17:31

Kenneth and Campbell returning to Egede’s farm

Music

17:41

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: As we retrace our trip to Ferdinand Egede’s farm, Kenneth tells me life has become harder for Greenland’s farmers.

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “They’ve had a lot of drought in the months of May and June

17:46

 

that has become more or less the new normal.  I think the climate has become much more fluctuating, actually more fluctuating

17:57

 

than I would have expected 10 years ago, so yeah”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “That’s difficult for farmers, isn’t it?”

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “It’s always difficult, because you have to adapt all the time and if you have to use a lot of money on one approach and then suddenly the whole regime changes and then you have to

do something else, that makes it a challenge”.

18:12

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “It’s never easy being a farmer is it?”

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “It’s never easy to be a farmer, exactly.  You’re never satisfied”.

18:35

 

Music

18:42

Aerial. Farmland

ERIC CAMPBELL: The farm doesn’t get many visitors.  It’s iced in every winter and supplies are limited.  

18:48

Egede

Ferdinand Egede can go months only seeing his two dogs, two sons, his wife, brother and sister-in-law and their 400 sheep. 

18:56

Egede on farm

Music

19:06

Campbell greets Egede

ERIC CAMPBELL:  He has no problem with isolation. The problem these days he tells us, is the weird weather. This winter the snow melted early, then froze.

19:18

 

FERDINAND EGEDE: [in translation by Kenneth Hoegh] “Instead of being protective snow cover it becomes a killing layer of ice”.

 

 

 

 

19:30

Aerial. Farm

ERIC CAMPBELL: Summers have been unusually dry, with unusually late rain.

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “We’ve had a prolonged drought and until

19:40

Kenneth

it became totally dry, you know everything got dry and then night before we were supposed to make the hay making, then it started to rain.  And that’s been quite problematic”.

19:50

Sheep

ERIC CAMPBELL: Ferdinand’s starting to think there might just be something in this talk of climate change.

 

“Well you certainly have the most beautiful location for a farm I’ve ever seen”.

20:00

Egede

FERDINAND EGEDE: [subtitle] “I’m happy you say this is a marvellous place but we’re also having our troubles with the droughts and prolonged insect attacks.  So we also have our problems”.

20:11

Aerials. Farm/return to town on ferry

Music

 

 

 

 

20:30

Icebergs/Campbell on ferry

ERIC CAMPBELL: We head back to town, fearful of being caught by ice.  Greenland has a long history of calving giant bergs.  One of them is believed to have sunk the Titanic in 1912.  But the warmer weather appears to be making this worse too.

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “I believe there is more, there is more ice. 

20:48

Kenneth on ferry

Suddenly in summer sometimes we get enormous amounts and that just blocks the fjord.  We’re a little bit lucky today that we went through”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “Yes, so this is actually a good day for ice”.

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “Oh yeah, this is a very good day, no problem whatsoever”.

21:17

Kenneth and Campbell on boat

ERIC CAMPBELL: There’s one more thing Kenneth wants to show us.  Ahead of us, in Prince William Sound, is the southern tip of the ice cap.

21:32

Kenneth

KENNETH HOEGH: “Well, where we are right now is probably where the ice cap

21:41

Boat at edge of ice cap

was a hundred years ago, before the real retreat started.  They say it started around 1880”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “And it’s all the way back there now”.

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “It’s all these three kilometres, way back there.

21:46

Ice cap/ Walking to ice cave

Music

21:59

Kenneth and Campbell under ice in cave

KENNETH HOEGH:  This is a new part of Greenland and now you’re inside Greenland.  Just look at that piece of rock standing there”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “Wow”.

22:11

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “We’re under the ice sheet.  So this is… you see this at the edges, you know small ice caves being formed”.

 

 

 

 

 

22:18

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: So how long has this been encased in ice?”

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “Probably at least six thousand years, probably, yeah… maybe longer”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “So it’s happening faster than you’re used to,

22:26

 

even you in your lifetime”.

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “Oh yes, but still we have to take care, it’s all being held by a few columns of ice and the rock here, the big rock”.

22:40

Campbell and Kenneth under ice

ERIC CAMPBELL: “And we still have several tonnes of ice on top of us”.

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “Oh yeah, oh yeah so if you, if something starts to crack… we move out, yeah?”

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “Don’t make any sudden movements”.

 

22:50

Blue ice cave

KENNETH HOEGH: “You know what the blue ice is?”

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “What’s that?”

 

KENNETH HOEGH: “That’s actually snow that has melted and then refrozen. That’s what creates the blue ice,

22:59

Kenneth and Campbell under blue ice ledge

and in a few years, you’ll look at no longer the blue ice, but actually the blue sky”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “Wow”.

23:08

 

Music

23:14

Fishing boats

ERIC CAMPBELL: The big melt may not have been the boon for farmers that many hoped for, but one group is celebrating.  Ninety per cent of Greenland’s export income comes from fishing.  Out of 56,000 people, some 2,000 work on small fishing boats.  Hundreds more work for the big fleets and fish processing factories. 

23:28

Andrias on boat

Andrias Olsen is a fleet manager at the State company, Royal Greenland.

 

 

23:53

Andrias interview

ANDRIAS OLSEN: “Generally we see higher stocks due to climate change, or at least due to warmer sea temperatures.  But also due to the ice cap melting and when the ice cap melts, a lot of nutritious water comes down the big fjord system which creates optimal conditions for fishery”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “So with all the bad things happening from climate change, you may be among the winners”.

24:01

 

ANDRIAS OLSEN: “Yeah at least it looks like that, yeah”.

24:26

Teunis weighing fish in lab

TEUNIS JANSEN: “470 grams”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: The most remarkable change has been the appearance of mackerel, a warm water fish rarely found in less than 8 degrees.

24:31

 

 Its mass migration so far north has left scientists stunned.

24:44

Teunis interview 

TEUNIS JANSEN: “Nobody had really expected it, but it has come quite fast”.

24:50

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: Teunis Jansen studies schooling fish at the Institute of Natural Resources.  He’s found himself in the middle of a maritime gold rush.

 

24:55

Teunis cutting mackerel in lab

TEUNIS JANSEN: “So in 2011 the first mackerel was caught in Greenland.  Within a few years, already in 2014, there was 85,000 tonnes landed by the fleet. 

25:06

Teunis interview

And that’s quite a lot.  It corresponds to about 20-24% of the national export of Greenland in that particular year”.

25:18

Fishermen

ERIC CAMPBELL: That’s created a whole new industry and another looks likely to follow.

25:26

Teunis cutting bag containing tuna

TEUNIS JANSEN: “In the last couple of years basically at the same time as the mackerel has arrived, Bluefin tunas have also entered Greenlandic waters and they come in as a by-catch while they’re trawling for mackerel. 

25:33

 

As you see here, and as you’re about to smell very soon… they are feeding on mackerel.  So this a semi-digested mackerel.  Yeah climate change takes many surprising ways I guess”.

25:53

 

Music

26:15

Children in Nuuk

ERIC CAMPBELL:  Greenland has come to see climate change as both a problem and an opportunity.  Each generation has had to learn to survive on scarce resources in a harsh climate and for centuries they’ve adapted to change. 

26:18

Campbell walks with Adam

Music

26:36

 

ERIC CAMPBELL:  Adam Lyberth’s ancestors moved down from the high Arctic, where they lived off seals and narwhal whales, to the south where they learned to fish and farm. But he finds it hard to share the joy of a warming climate. 

26:45

Adam and Campbell by lake

On our last day in Kangerlussuaq, he took me to what used to be a deep lake alongside Russell Glacier.  It’s almost empty.

27:00

 

“So just over there it used to be as high as the glacier, now it’s all drained away because the glacier collapsed, and when did this happen?”

27:11

 

ADAM LYBERTH: [subtitle] “Last year in September.  This is part of the accelerating of climate change, many things like that happening. So this is part of a former lake. 

27:19

 

One less lake like that”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “And that’s happening all over?”

 

ADAM LYBERTH: “Yeah”.

 

ERIC CAMPBELL: “Wow. It’s frightening”.

 

ADAM LYBERTH: “Yeah”.

27:31

Aerial over lake/Adam walking on cap

Music

27:38

 

ADAM LYBERTH:  [subtitle] “The ice melting touches my heart. 

27:56

Adam

It’s a fact that the ice sheet is melting and the landscape is changing.  Look around, it’s happening very fast”.

28:01

Adam walking on cap

Music

28:19

 

Reporter - Eric Campbell
Producer/Camera - Matt Davies
Editor - Andrew Barnes
Researcher - Marie-Louise Olson
Additional footage - Adam Lyberth
Colourist - Simon Brazzalotto
Sound Mix - Evan Horton
Music - Nanook, Frederik Elsner, Katsi Kleist, Piniartut, Qilaat, Audio Network
Thanks to Atlantic Records Greenland
Social Media - April Chan
Assistant Editor - Tom Carr
Program Assistant - Melanie Lobendahn
Production Manager - Michelle Dargaville
Associate Producer - Michael Doyle
Executive Producer -Marianne Leitch

abc.net.au/foreign
©2018

 

Out point after credits

 

29:10

 

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