Producer/Camera: Will Reid

Producer: Hareem Khan

Reporter: Janice Petersen

 

 

 

 

VO: AS YEAR 12S ALL OVER AUSTRALIA  GET READY TO SIT THEIR END OF YEAR EXAMS

 

 

 

Day 3 [01:31:33] DENISE: In my research high stakes testing is, is of concern.

 

VO: WE HEAD TO SINGAPORE  WITH SOME OF AUSTRALIA’S TOP TEACHERS - TO FIND OUT WHY IT’S STUDENTS ARE THE SMARTEST IN THE WORLD

 

Actuality – kids doing test “finished”

 

 

 

00:22:21 – JP: WHAT HOMEWORK DO YOU STILL HAVE TO DO TONIGHT?

X: TONIGHT I HAVE TO DO ENGLISH PAPER AND ALSO I HAVE TO DO MATH PAPER

JP: HOW LONG WILL THAT TAKE YOU

X: AROUND 2 HOURS FOR ALL OF IT COMBINED…

 

VO: BUT WITH A SYSTEM BASED ON HIGH PRESSURE TESTING -  AT A YOUNG AGE, WE ASK

WHETHER THERE IS A

HIDDEN COST OF EXCELLENCE

 

02:40:46:14 – 02:48:00:12

 

CHARMAINE THOUGHTRACK DAY 1 @: [01:38:56] My name is Charmaine, I'm 17 this year and I am taking a media course at Polytechnic,

 

[01:06:11]  So school was something I struggled with a lot,  [01:17:02] CHARMAINE: So I was diagnosed with depression and anxiety

 

 

 

 

 

VO:

Singapore tops international leaderboards when it comes to learning 

 

UPSOT FROM TEACHER

 

 

 

BIT OF CLASSROOM NOISE – KIDS UPSOTS

 

DAY 7 @ 01:16:45 OPENING PTC:

SO I’M HERE IN A SINGAPOREAN TUITION CLASS AND I’M ABOUT TO FIND OUT WHETHER I’M SMARTER THAN A NINE YEAR OLD SINGAPOREAN STUDENT AND I CAN TELL YOU I’M NOT CONFIDENT AT ALL

 

SHOTS OF DIFFERENT STUDENTS AND THEN LAND ON JANICE DAY 7 @ 01:08:36

 

JANICE UPSOT “I’m not nervous I’m fine, fine”

 

 

 

DAY 7 @ 01:20:09 – SHOT OF THE QUESTION [

 

VO: THIS QUESTION WOULD HAVE MANY AUSTRALIAN ADULTS SCRATCHING THEIR HEADS

 

BUT FOR THESE YEAR 3 STUDENTS, ITS CHILDS PLAY

 

 

 

DAY 7 @ 01:08:46 – JANICE & STUDENTS START SOLVING

 

TEACHER: DONE

STUDENTS: DONE

JANICE: SIGH, OH NO

 

 

01:11:27 - KIDS: YOU DIDN’T DRAW A MODEL…

01:11:19 – JANICE PTC:

I FEEL LIKE I MISSED A FUNDAMENTAL…SOMETHING FUNDAMENTAL IS MISSING AND MINE DOESN’T HAVE AS MANY BOXES AS THE OTHER KIDS

 

 

THE APPROACH THESE KIDS ARE USING IS CALLED MODELING, AND ITS JUST ONE OF UNIQUE METHODS OF LEARNING BUILT INTO THEIR CURRICULUM

 

 

01:13:32 JANICE PTC

I’M GETTING A LITTLE BIT OF A TASTE AT JUST HOW COMPETITIVE THE SINGAPOREAN EDUCATION SYSTEM IS, I’M FALLING WAY BEHIND MY PEERS AND THE PRESSURE IS REAL

 

 

TRANSITION

 

 

VO:                             

I’M HERE TO FIND OUT, EXACTLY WHAT IT IS ABOUT THE SINGAPOREAN SCHOOL SYSTEM - AND THE CULTURE -  THAT GENERATES SUCH SMART KIDS

 

 

 

 

 

 

In situ meet and greet

 

 

VO: I’M MEETING ONE OF THE KEY ARCHITECTS OF THE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM FOR THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

 

 

 

[00:00:22] JANICE: Singapore has become the number one education system in the world, how did it happen?

 [01:36:01] L: Well education has always been allocated the second highest budget - with a small nation that has no agriculture, very small land, no natural resources, we can only invest on the mass of the size of a fist that is in the head - which is the brain, [01:36:24]

ARCHIVE SOT: A program of educational expansion with its accent on science and technology is vital to maintain and improve the living standards of the people in Singapore

 

 

 

VO: FOUNDING FATHER LEE KUAN YEW TRANSFORMED THE COUNTRY FROM POVERTY TO PROSPERITY IN A SINGLE GENERATION, BY FOCUSING ON IT’S HUMAN RESOURCES

 

LU MEI SAYS THE GOVERNMENT HAS ALWAYS INVESTED HEAVILY IN EDUCATION.

 

[00:00:44] L: So right from decolonisation days in the 60s, we need people with skills who can work in the factories, who can work in the offices and a large part of investment has been put into education. 

 

 

 

 

IT’S ALWAYS BEEN ABOUT LONG-TERM SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC PLANNING

 

[00:03:36] L: As educators, we are not educating our children for today, not for tomorrow. We are educating them for the future economy in 20 years time. [00:04:15] L: And that's pretty much what the Ministry of Education has to do often. To look into the crystal ball to what is necessary and what is needed for the future generation

 

 

 

Janice walking about and into the shopping mall

 

 

 

 

I’M ON MY WAY TO A CLASS WHERE THE FOCUS IS VERY MUCH ON LEARNING FOR THE FUTURE

 

 

 

JANICE PTC

DAY 6 @ 01:36:32

IT’S SATURDAY MORNING HERE IN SINGAPORE AND WHILE MOST AUSSIE KIDS MIGHT BE HITTING THE SPORTING FIELDS, THESE 4 YEAR OLDS ARE ATTENDING ROBOTICS CLASS.

 

 

VO: THE LITTLE ONES EXPERIENCE MATHS THROUGH PLAY

 

 

BUT THE OLDER KIDS ARE HERE EXPANDING THEIR MATHS COMPREHENSION -  IN PREPARTION FOR THE BIG NATIONAL EXAM THAT TAKES PLACE AT THE END OF YEAR SIX… CALLED THE PSLE’S

 

UPSOT

TEACHER: Select either this area or that area

 

 

 

00:53:38 J: HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT COMING HERE ON A SATURDAY MORNING

00:53:56: ANSEL: I’M USUALLY QUITE EXCITED TO COME I WANT TO DO A LOT OF BUILDING AND PROGRAMMING

 

UPSOT

TEACHER: We’re treading the line

 

 

 

VO: A STUDENT’S PSLE SCORE DETERMINES WHICH SECONDARY SCHOOL THEY WILL GO TO

 

HIGH SCORERS QUALIFY FOR THE TOP ACADEMIC SCHOOLS

 

WHILST LOW SCORERS FIND THEMSELVES IN SCHOOLS GEARED TOWARDS VOCATIONAL TRAINING

 

THIS SYSTEM OF STREAMING CAN PUT A LOT OF PRESSURE ON KIDS AND THEIR FAMILIES.

 

 

 

FADE / TRANSITION

 

 

 

VO:

ONE OF SINGAPORE’S BEST AND BRIGHTEST IS ABOUT TO START HIS DAY

 

12 YEAR OLD XUAN IS IN FULL THROTTLE PSLE PREPARATION MODE…A ROUTINE THAT STARTS AT THE CRACK OF DAWN

 

UPSOT:

JC: Morning!

THOUGHTRACK DAD: DAY 5_C100:32:38] TIAN: So Xuan would normally wake up around 6.40- 6.45. After that, we eat breakfast

UPSOT:

00:14:13  JC: this has not been marked you knoe

15:07 JC:  Let me see how many marks you have for comp

15:16 JC:  (Gasp) 9 out of 15 oh my god. That’s quite a lot of mistakes. OK we go through when you come back

THOUGHTRACK DAD: DAY 5_C100:32:38] TIAN: and around 7 o'clock, I will then fetch to school, drop him off

UPSOT:

JC: Wait for me. Ok Bye, have a great day.

 

 

[00:18:46] JC: School ends around 1:30,

 

UPSOT:

Xuan: Hello

Tian: Hello

 

[00:18:46] JC: and he will be back home about 1:45

 

UPSOT:

JC: What are you watching?

Xuan: What happens when you die

 

[00:18:50] JC: and he has to take a quick lunch before we rush him down to his science tuition that starts at 2:30. Science tuition ends at 4:30 and then we have to rush him down to his usual drama class from 5 to 7.

 

 

UPSOT:

TIAN: Lets have dinner

JANICE: This looks great!

 

VO: AFTER A QUICK FAMILY MEAL, IT’S MORE STUDYING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X: TONIGHT I HAVE TO DO ENGLISH PAPER AND ALSO I HAVE TO DO MATH PAPER

JP: HOW LONG WILL THAT TAKE YOU

X: AROUND 2 HOURS FOR ALL OF IT COMBINED…

 

 

 

 

00:22:47 – JP: AND THEN WHAT ABOUT THESE HERE THAT’S PSLE EXAM PAPERS

X: THIS IS EXTRA STUDY SO IF AM FREE I CAN DO THEM FOR EXTRA REVISION

JP: OK BUT IT’S GETTING LATE ALREADY SO YOU PROBABLY DON’T HAVE TIME FOR THOSE

 

UPSOT: I’D RATHER SPEND TIME WITH MY FAMILY

 

 

[00:24:47] J: So why are the PSLE exams such a big deal?

[00:24:51] X: So it's really frightening. So everyone wants to move onto a good school, to get a better job and it is worth it for the long run.

 

[00:23:56] X: I can see a lot of my friends like scrambling doing work and saying that they don't have any time to play.

 

[00:24:17] J: Where do you think that pressure comes from?

 

[00:24:20] X: I think it comes from our teachers, friends, family and it can get very stressful when everyone is looking at you thinking that you can score really well.

 

 

[00:35:53] J: And if you had a wish where you could do one thing a bit more each day, what would that be?

[00:35:58] X: More sleep.                       

 

 

DAY 5_C1 [00:33:41] J: So when does he wrap up? When's sleep time?

[00:33:44] T: So sleep time is around 10.45 to 11. That's quite normal for a Singapore kiD [laughs]

 

 

VO: SUPPORTING A CHILD’S EDUCATION IS LIKE A SECOND JOB FOR MANY SINGAPOREAN PARENTS, AND MUM JANICE AND DAD TIAN ARE NO EXCEPTION

 

THOUGHTRACK MOM: DAY 5_C1 [01:37:33] JC: it's our way of life. We have a full time job but when we come back we still have to make sure that we look through the children's work and to help them to the best of our ability.

 

 

VO: THIS WAY OF LIFE IS DEEPLY ROOTED IN SINGAPOREAN PARENTING…IT’S CALLED KIASU

 

 

[01:19:10] J: can you tell me what a 'kiasu' parent is?

 

 

[01:19:31] JC: It's a Chinese dialogue yeah. Afraid to lose. So when it comes to our children, when we say that we are 'kiasu' parents, it has a negative connotation. It usually refers to parents that go all out to push their children, regardless of whether the children is stressed or not, to go for the best in terms of everything. [01:20:15] JC: They are afraid to lose at the expense of their children's health, their children's mental health, the stress level.

 

[00:39:23] J: So if you take a step back though, do you think the balance is right?

[00:39:30] JC: Hmm that's a good question.

[00:39:32] JC: Um balance between work and play?

[00:39:34] JC: I would say that there is a season for everything so I would say that right now, the balance is a bit off

 

I think you have to suffer a little bit more you know and think of the gains at the end of the examination.

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

UPSOT:

00:41:15 JC: OK a truck carries some fruits. Two/sevenths of the fruits are durians, how many likes durians? Stinks? C’mon are you Singaporeans?

 

VO:

 

TO PREPARE FOR THEIR BIG EXAMS, 70% OF KIDS HERE ATTEND AFTER SCHOOL TUITION CLASSES

 

THESE 12 YEAR OLDS ARE LEARNING ADVANCED ALGEBRA.

 

UPSOT:

00:42:17 JC: OK Tell me. How many units for durian? 14. Excellent.

 

LEADING TODAY’S CLASS IS XUAN’S MUM JANICE, SHE’S A FORMER SCHOOL TEACHER, AND NOW OWNS ONE OF SINGAPORE’S LARGEST  MATHS TUITION COMPANIES

 

 

[00:17:51] J: So what's the secret to the success of Singapore? 

[00:18:23] JC: I personally felt that the secret lies with the way we teach in Singapore which moves away from roTE learning to more critical thinking.

[00:08:41] J: If the education system here in Singapore is so well planned and thought out, why is tuition necessary?

 

[00:11:59] JC: One of the key principles in our Singapore education is 'lift the bottom but not cap the top.' So in line with this principle, I feel that the tuition industry plays a supportive role to the local school system.

 

[00:12:28] JC: So tuition centers are privately owned. This means to say that they can cater their curriculum to differentiated learning levels. 

 

If I have a weaker student, I can actually offer tuition on a one-to-one basis to help the child bridge certain learning gaps.

 

[00:12:50] JC: If I have a stronger students, learning in a group we can help them achieve their fullest potential.

 

 

 

 

 

 

56:56:00 actuality

 

JC: Here is our wall of testimonials – It shows that our students truly improve after they have attended our lessons

JP: I see- look at A, A, A A plus!

JC: YES! Would you like to send your kids here?

JP: Well it sounds like you're getting the results Janice

 

VO: BUT IN THIS TUITION CENTRE, KIDS AREN’T THE ONLY ONES GOING TO SCHOOL…

 

57:00

JP: So do some of the parents sit in on the class?

58:03 JC:– we actually have a debrief session for parents after lessons like what you can see here -

It takes a village to raise a child, so they're going to listen to what their teacher has taught for the day, and how they can go back and to assist their children further

58:30 - that’s a bit of pressure on the parents as well.

JC - of course, its pressure everywhere, it’s a competition!

 

 

 

 

 

GV BREATHER HERE = NEW DAY

 

 

 

 

VO:

I’M INTERESTED TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT WHAT’S AT STAKE IN THIS COMPETITION

 

SO I’M VISITING A SINGAPOREAN HIGH SCHOOL.

 

IF KIDS SCORE LOW ON THEIR PSLES, THEY MIGHT END UP AT A SCHOOL LIKE THIS ONE – WITH A FOCUS ON VOCATIONAL TRAINING.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VO:

 

STUDENTS HERE ARE PREPPING FOR JOBS IN THE RETAIL OR HOSPITALITY INDUSTRIES

 

MANY OF THE 12 YEAR OLDS STUDYING FOR THEIR PSLE’S -  AND THEIR PARENTS - WOULD CONSIDER PLACEMENT IN A SCHOOL LIKE THIS AS A FAILURE.

 

THIS IS BECAUSE OF THE STIGMA AROUND NON-ACADEMIC PATHWAYS. 

 

BUT 14 YEAR OLD RHEA HAS A DIFFERENT TAKE ON IT

 

 

 

00:18:23 – JP: this looks like a café to me but we’re actually at school aren’t we?

00:18:30 – RHEA: Yeah it’s a retail café we come here for our lessons and practice coffee from our teacher, Mr Z – over there!

 

 

00:25:51 M: My experience with PSLE wasn’t very well, and I would get teased, and I didn’t want to be in such an environment

00:26:13 JP: But that test is quite important isn’t it

00:26:33 M: I went for the test but I didn’t do well – but look where it got me

 

00:22:15 – JP: Do you feel like you’ve found your enjoyment of learning again?

00:22:20 – M: Defintiely I enjoy coming to school I don’t dread it as much as I used to I really enjoy coming to see my teachers and having my lessons in such an environment

 

 

BEING PLACED IN THE VOCATIONAL STREAM TOOK THE PRESSURE OFF RHEA,

 

 AND ALLOWED HER TO RE-EXAMINE WHAT SHE WANTS OUT OF HER EDUCATION

 

 

 

VO:

 

THIS SCHOOL IS PART OF THE MOVING LANDSCAPE OF EDUCATION IN SINGAPORE, SHIFTING FOCUS TO PREPARING STUDENTS FOR JOBS IN THE REAL WORLD

 

 

TRANSITION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VO: COMING UP

 

AUSSIE TEACHERS LEARN FROM THE BEST

 

DENISE WALKING AROUND DISCOVERING

DAY 8_C1 [00:55:59] D: I'm actually really curious around the way in which they develop such great standards. What do they actually do in classrooms

 

BUT IS THERE A HIDDEN COST TO SINGAPORE’S SUCCESS

 

[01:21:25]  CHARMAINE: I missed a lot of school. And most of the time I spent laying on my table not listening or you know crying in the toilet hiding. [01:17:02] I was diagnosed with depression and anxiety  

 

 

 

 

 

VO: AS SINGAPORE CONTINUES TO EXCEL AT EDUCATION, HOW DOES AUSTRALIA STACK UP?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VO: THE WORLD CUP OF ACADEMICS IS THE PISA STUDY. THE PROGRAM FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ASSESSMENT.

 

THE LAST ASSESSMENT WAS IN 2015…

 

 

AND SINGAPORE WAS AT THE TOP OF THE LEADERBOARD

 

ACROSS THREE SUBJECTS - Maths, reading and science

 

In comparison, Australia came out significantly lower.

 

COMING 25th IN MATHS

 

16th IN READING

 

AND 14th IN SCIENCE

 

Well behind other OECD nations like Estonia, Poland, and New Zealand

 

 

So how has SINGAPORE climbed to the top - especially in vital STEM subjects - while AUSTRALIA continues to fall behind?

 

In Singapore, students are taught by specialised maths

teachers from year 3 onwards

 

IN AUSTRALIA, specialized teaching DOESN’T START UNTIL HIGH SCHOOL –

 

BUT there’s a chronic shortage of teachers

 

In fact Less than 1 in 4 high school kids in Australia are ACTUALLY taught by a qualified Maths teacher.

 

 

 

SO WHAT CAN AUSTRALIA DO TO CATCH UP?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VO: TO FIND OUT, SOME OF AUSTRALIA’S BEST TEACHERS HAVE COME TO SINGAPORE TO SEE exactly what makes IT’S SCHOOL SYSTEM the best in the world

 

 

DENISE LOFTS WANTS TO SEE WHAT SHE CAN TAKE HOME TO HER CLASSROOM IN ULLADULLA NSW

DAY 8_C1 [00:55:59] D: I'm actually really curious around the way in which they develop such great standards. What do they actually do in classrooms and of course, how do they leverage technology?

 

 

 

VO: THIS TRIP IS PART OF A PRIZE THE TEACHERS HAVE WON FOR SHOWING INNOVATION IN LEARNING IN THEIR OWN AUSSIE SCHOOLS

 

 

 

VO: THEIR FIRST STOP IS THE NAN CHIAU PRIMARY SCHOOL – PSLE PREPARATION IS IN FULL SWING AND THE PRESSURE IS PALPABLE

 

UPSOT:

Monica: Okay, so who’s doing a powerpoint?

 

 

VO: DENISE & THE TEACHERS ARE OBSERVING A SCIENCE CLASS WITH CLOSE TO 40 STUDENTS GETTING READY FOR THEIR BIG EXAMS… 

 

UPSOT:

Teacher: This is what we have done last lesson, OK

 

 

VO: EVERY STUDENT HAS A DEVICE ON THEIR DESK AND ARE ALL CONNECTED TO A SPECIAL SYSTEM RUN BY THE SCHOOL

 

 

[00:41:05] JP: Its interesting seeing so many kids with their own phones on the table, we’re not really used to that in Australia are we?

[00:41:12] D: No, definitely not in primary schools

 

[00:43:05] TEACHER UPSOT: Alright so lets sit down, now, click the start button, this is individual – not group work yet

 

[00:41:53] JP: And I notice now that the teacher’s talking, the kids have turned their device around to face the front of the room

[00:41:58] D: Yes. And I observe that – it’s a really fantastic tactic for engagement so the students are well tuned into the teacher

[00:42:23] D: They’re all listening to her, no one is on a device while she’s speaking. 

 

 

TRANSITION

 

 

VO:

 

WITH OUR CAMERAS IN THE ROOM I’M SURE THESE STUDENTS ARE ON THEIR BEST BEHAVIOUR TODAY

 

BUT WE’RE TOLD STUDENTS IN GENERAL SHOW A GREAT DEAL OF RESPECT FOR THEIR TEACHERS.

 

THEY SHOW A DESIRE TO LEARN AND THERE ARE NOT MANY DISRUPTIONS

 

AND THIS RESPECT FOR TEACHERS IS SEEN ACROSS THE SOCIAL SPECTRUM

 

 

ONLY APPLICANTS FROM THE TOP 30% OF ALL GRADUATES ARE ACCEPTED INTO A TEACHING DEGREE

 

…IT PAYS WELL AND IS CONSIDERED AN ELITE ROLE ON PAR WITH A PROFESSION IN MANAGEMENT or accounting

 

 

 

 

[01:22:52] JP: here in Singapore we are talking about the top 30% of graduates that become teachers. So that's very different.

[01:22:55] D: Oh actually that was, it was interesting when we started talking when we first arrived that they said the pay is this and you get the bonuses. But having spent time in the schools they are very hard working

01:25:13] D: teachers are very much appreciated there profile within the community is high.  Wouldn't that be great in our own country if that was the desire, that we were making [01:25:43] the choices that yes you get to take the top 30%. [TRIM]

 

 

 

VO: DENISE IS IMPRESSED BY THE WELL RESOURCED CLASSROOMS AND QUALITY TEACHING STAFF, BUT SHE HAS CONCERNS ABOUT THE HIGH PRESSURE EXAMS AT SUCH A YOUNG AGE

 

 

 

[01:31:33] D: In my research high stakes testing is, is of concern. Often its just a way of measuring, and it's really very a long way away from learning and from improving. And I see that they're preparing preparing preparing for these tests that happen at the end of primary school, for them then to choose a path beyond, into secondary school. And I'm not sure [01:32:03] how that would work in our system. And I believe that that would put a lot of pressure on the schools, the teachers  and the principals.

 

 

 

 

VO: FOR CHARMAINE, THE RELENTLESS PRESSURE TO SUCCEED IN THE PSLE’S HAD DEVASTATING CONSEQUENCES

 

 

 

 

CHARMAINE THOUGHTRACK DAY 1 @: [01:38:56] My name is Charmaine, I'm 17 this year

 

 

 

[01:06:11]  So school was something I struggled with a lot, and something I've struggled with since I was like super-duper young. I think it’s just the kind of environment that you're in. Um, too much pressure. 

 

 

EVEN THOUGH CHARMAINE MADE IT INTO THE TOP ACADEMIC STREAM, SHE SAYS SHE STRUGGLED TO KEEP UP

 

[01:10:32] CHARMAINE: I kind of developed a fear of failure. Like a really really intense one.

 

 

[01:15:02] JANICE: So it sounds like it didn't bring the best out of you.

[01:15:07] CHARMAINE: It did not bring the best out of me.

 

 

CHARMAINE OLAY – TRANSITION – MUSIC SHIFT

 

 

[01:17:02] CHARMAINE: So I was diagnosed with depression and anxiety

 

 

[01:21:25]  CHARMAINE: I missed a lot of school. And most of the time I spent laying on my table not listening or you know crying in the toilet hiding. And I think it got really really low and when it felt like I would never have a future again.

 

 

 

VO:

 

IN 2018 ALONE – THE SAMARITANS OF SINGAPORE – THE COUNTRY’S LEADING MENTAL HEALTH NGO – SAW A 56% RISE IN YOUNG PEOPLE ASKING FOR HELP.

 

 

UPSOT: introduction between Charmaine, Mum and Janice

 

 

 

VO: TODAY, WITH THE SUPPORT OF HER MUM, CHARMAINE IS DOING MUCH BETTER, SHE’S A STUDENT AT A POLYTECHNIC ACADEMY.

 

AND BELIEVES THAT DOING WELL ACADEMICALLY SHOULDN’T COME AT A COST

 

UPSOT:

JP: Such a beautiful place you’ve got here!

 

 

 

[02:07:16] CHARMAINE: I think that even though we are a leader in education I think that we can do a lot better, and I think that relieving the pressure on children does not mean that we will necessarily lose that position in fact it might just further cement us in that number one spot.

[02:12:30] JANICE: So is there a wider conversation happening around mental health for school kids? 

[02:12:38] CHARMAINE: I think there has been more awareness recently. I am really really thankful for that. we are slowly but surely normalising it and I think with my generation a lot will change, hopefully for the better. 

[01:55:48] JANICE: Do you feel you've got your little girl back?

[01:56:00] MOTHER: Yes! Very much! (laughs) And I'm very thankful

 

CHARMAINE: Maybe a little bit too much

 

 

 

VO: SINGAPORE IS COMING TO REALIZE THAT EVEN THOUGH IT’S NUMBER 1 – THERE’S STILL ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT …

 

 

VO: RECENTLY – THE GOVERNMENT ANNOUNCED SOME CHANGES TO THE STREAMING SYSTEM

 

NEWS UPSOT:

28 SECONDARY SCHOOLS WILL START TRIALLING SUBJECT BASED BANDING NEXT YEAR

 

INSTEAD OF SENDING 12-YEAR-OLDS INTO EDUCATION STREAMS BASED ON THEIR PSLE RESULTS, SECONDARY STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO CHOOSE FROM A MIX OF SUBJECTS AT DIFFERENT LEVELS OF DIFFICULTY, BASED ON THEIR CHANGING ABILITIES.

 

LOUIS NG – SINGAPORE MP

SOT: EVERY SCHOOL IS A GOOD SCHOOL, AND NOW LETS MAKE EVERY CLASS A GOOD CLASS

 

 

TRANSITION TO AUSTRALIA

 

 

 

 

NEW VO: BUT FOR XUAN, EXAMS ARE LOOMING 

 

THE CHANGES TO SINGAPORE STREAMING WON’T HAPPEN IN TIME TO SPARE HIM FROM SITTING HIS PSLE’S

 

HE’S UP TO HIS EARS IN STUDY AT JUST AGE 12

 

 

00:38:44] J: Put it this way, alot of kids in Australia have alot of free time in comparison to you. So they do alot of things outdoors. They might do soccer or gymnastics. How would you feel about doing more of that stuff?

 [00:39:53] X: I feel that if we have enough time to finish all the homework that we are given in class, I think it's acceptable that we can have a little bit more free time during the day and play with our friends and spend time with our family.

 

 

 

 

[01:00:24] JC: But we want to give our children many opportunities to be successful and we have to balance that between pushing them, monitoring their stress level and knowing when to let go. 

 

SHOTS HERE

 

[01:41:22] JC: So we want to stress on responsibility, on being hard working, diligence. Because I believe that these are the values that will bring our children far in life. It's not just the academic results. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

V/ O: Back in Australia,  a few weeks on from the Singapore teacher’s trip Ulladulla Principal Denise Lofts is putting WHAT SHE LEARNT OVERSEAS INTO PRACTICE

 

 

UPSOT: food tech class – kids this is great!!!

we don't always recognise talent well. In actual fact, finding our gifted and talented students, sometimes they're hidden. They are not all the Lisa Simpsons. Sometimes they're the Barts.

 

 

 

V/O: While Singapore continues to top leaderboards in education, Denise recognises IT’S system is not perfect

 

But she is still keen to see if some of their methods can help kids here unlock their potential.

 

 [00:47:58] J: Have you got... Have you got a checklist you've drawn up? What's the top of your list?

[00:48:02] D: Definitely looking at the way we structure our school day and what happens from that and the fact that the curriculum is so crowded. You know, how can I as a school and as a school principal look at how we can navigate that. That's one of the things.

00:38:31] J: We also need to attract talented teachers don't we? So how do you go about that? Getting the best teachers out here in a rural school?

 

[00:38:41] D: So that's a great question because we really do need maths teachers as does the rest of the state and special ed teachers. And we attract them because if we are a good company or a good school, you attract talent. 

[00:39:07] D: But if we don't continue  to be progressive, we're not going to get that talent.

 

 

 

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